Further progress on two fiddles (8/24/21)

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Slower Progress:

(I actually got a fair amount done, though…)

A few weeks ago, I bookmatched my plates and then cut ribs and necks, so as to set up “kits” for six new five-string fiddles. Then, I got started building two of them, as parallel builds.

Since I last posted, two weeks ago, I did not exactly stay on schedule, but I didn’t get too far behind.

Scroll Carving

I had completed the first scroll and neck, and had begun working on the second neck, when, I “kinda took an unplanned detour.”

scroll carving for five string fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop Luthier.
Beginning to carve the pegbox for fiddle #1.

 

carving pegbox for five string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon my Chet Bishop, luthier.
Heavy wood removal from pegbox interior.

 

sawing out scroll on 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop, luthier.
Beginning the saw-carving of the scroll

 

Saw-carving the scroll for a 5-string bluegrass fiddle, handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop. luthier.
Saw-carving the scroll.

 

scroll for 5-string bluegrass fiddle, handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop, luthier.
Scroll nearing completion

 

scroll for 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon, by Chet Bishop, luthier.
Scroll #1 essentially complete.

 

Then I Had a Small Mishap:

I had worked for 12 hours, Monday the 16th, and afterward, I was getting pretty tired. My hands were tired, brain was tired, too, I suppose…anyway:

I had begun carving the second scroll, completed the saw-carving part, and was removing waste wood with a small gouge, when, I slipped, annnnd, just happened to have my left hand in the path of the misdirected gouge. (sigh…)

Entry wound!

 

Exit wound!

 

Both sides at once!

 

Urgent Care? Emergency Room?

First we tried going to an Urgent Care clinic. We arrived there, and then discovered that (a) they only work by appointment, and (b) they don’t take medicare insurance, anyway. I asked what my options were, and they said, “Everything else is closed! Go to the ER!” (Sigh… very expensive option!)

So, about 30 minute later we arrived at the Emergency Room at St. Vincent Hospital. They were busy as usual, so we waited for about four hours. But after that, the ER people washed it out with sterile water, X-Rayed it to eliminate the possibility of torn bone or tendons, and applied two little “Steri-Strips!”

Steri-Strips from the ER.

 

I guess that was normal,  but it felt pretty “exposed,” and was very prone to bumps (which were pretty uncomfortable when they happened.) So, after we got home, Ann bandaged me up with a heavily padded dressing so that I could sleep without bumping it. That was a real help, and I slept well.

I kind of piddled around, the next day…partly too tired, I suppose, as we had arrived home somewhat after 3AM, and we got to bed after 4AM. Partly just not feeling real good. Anyway, I had other things that needed doing, so I didn’t work on fiddles for that day.

Bandage for protection.

 

Red Violin beginning? This was the second scroll, in progress when I slipped.

Back to Work!

I got back to work on Wednesday. It turned out that I really needed two hands for most things, so it slowed me down rather badly, having a bulky bandage on the left paw. However, I was finally able to get the fingerboard installed on the first scroll/neck so that I could shape them as a unit.

Fingerboard installed for 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop, luthier
Fingerboard installed the second day after the injury.

 

That was kind of encouraging, seeing some progress again.

neck and fingerboard with five-string fiddles by Chet Bishop, Luthier.
Neck #1 with the two completed front plates and garland assemblies.

 

back plate and neck assembly with dive string fiddles by Chet Bishop, Luthier.
I had also traced and cut out the back plate for fiddle #1.  (Big Leaf Maple: Pretty stuff!)

 

Then I set the neck on fiddle #1:

cutting neck mortise in 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop, Luthier
Beginning the neck mortise. Notice the hard, heavy winter reeds in the Douglas Fir front plate.

 

cutting the neck mortise on a 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop. Luthier.
The cut-out in the front plate for the neck mortise.

 

completed neck mortise in 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop, Luthier.
Completed neck mortise

 

neck set completed in 5-string bluegrass fiddle, handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop, Luthier.
Completed Neck-set. (Back of the neck heel will still have to be sawn off.)

 

Healing up!

After that, we had appointments with various people, so I didn’t get a lot done on Thursday or Friday. By the time the weekend had rolled around, I had the biggest bandages off, and was sporting a plain finger bandage, but I had to be pretty careful.  Bumps were still pretty unpleasant.

Thumb exit wound, healing well.

 

So, after having removed the bulky bandage, I went back to work on fiddle #2, carving that “Red Violin” scroll into just a plain, “five-string fiddle scroll.” It looked as though the majority of the “gore” would simply be carved away: so, no “Red Violin!” (By the way, that little gouge, third from the right, is the one that perforated my thumb.)

scroll for 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop, luthier.
Beginning work on the second scroll, again.

 

scroll nearing completion for a 5-string bluegrass fiddle handmade in Oregon by Chet Bishop. Luthier.
Second scroll nearing completion.

I will post more again, soon. Sorry for the hiatus: it wasn’t intentional. 🙂

 

Thanks for looking.

 

 

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